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Tuesday, December 11, 2018

U.S. Marine Corps Special Operations Command - MARSOC


United States Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC) is a component command of the United States Special Operations Command that comprises the Marine Corps' contribution to SOCOM. Its core capabilities are direct action, special reconnaissance and foreign internal defense. MARSOC has also been directed to conduct counter-terrorism, and information operations.

MARSOC's organization was finalized in 2007. The base unit of MARSOC is the fourteen-man Marine Special Operations Team (MSOT), commanded by a captain (O-3) as Team Commander, assisted by a master sergeant (E-8) as Team Chief. Each team has two identical squads, or Tactical Elements, each led by a gunnery sergeant (E-7) as Element Leader. MARSOC is based at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina and is split into three subordinate commands: Marine Raider Regiment, Marine Raider Support Group, Marine Special Operations School.

As always, the above artworks are available via my “Military Insignia” galleries from FineArt America

To active duty or reserve military personnel, veterans and their family members: I grant an explicit permission to download the above images to be used for non-profit/non-commercial and charitable causes, benefiting troops and their families, as well as for non-commercial internal duty-specific purposes, such as unit website design, training materials and presentations.

The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, The Institute of Heraldry, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Special Operations Joint Task Force - Afghanistan - NSOCC-A/SOJTF-A


United States Army Special Operations Forces - Afghanistan have been conducting operations since the fall of 2001. The SOF personnel have deployed from a number of U.S. special operations units (SEALs, Green Berets, MARSOC, etc.) and over time worked as part of several different SOF units in Afghanistan. Currently (mid-2016) almost all U.S. SOF units in Afghanistan fall under the command of the NATO Special Operations Component Command – Afghanistan / Special Operations Joint Task Force – Afghanistan. That is a long name for a military organization so most people just use the acronym of NSOCC-A / SOJTF-A. An even shortened version is NSOCC-A or SOJTF-A; depending on your nationality it seems.
NSOCC-A / SOJTF-A is under a United States commander – a Major General (two-star) position. The non-U.S. SOF units fall under the command of NSOCC-A. U.S. SOF come under SOJTF-A. The commander of SOJTF-A is also the commander of NSOCC-A; so he is dual-hatted. He reports to the commander of the Resolute Support Mission – a U.S. four-star general.
The mission of Special Operations Forces – Afghanistan is to conduct “. . . Security Force Assistance and targeted Counter-Terrorism (CT) in Afghanistan to ensure the enduring relevance, proficiency, capability, and sustainability of the Afghan Special Security Force as a CT partner, and to deny safe haven to Al Qaeda and its affiliates and adherents.” 
The components of NSOCC-A / SOJTF-A include the Special Operations Task Force – Afghanistan (SOTF-A), a battalion-sized unit (usually U.S. Army Special Forces), Combined Joint Special Operations Aviation Component – Afghanistan (CJSOAC-A), General Command Police Special Units Special Operations Advisory Group (GCPSU SOAG), and a task force working the CT mission.
Special Operations Forces – Afghanistan are involved in the Train, Advise, and Assist (TAA) mission working with a number of Afghan SOF units. These include the Afghan National Army (ANA) Special Operations Kandaks, National Mission Units (NMU) of the Ministry of Interior, and the Afghan Air Force Special Mission Wing (SMW). U.S. SOF is also heavily involved in the advisory effort for the Afghan Local Police (ALP) – a village-focused security program sponsored by the Afghan Ministry of Interior.
In addition, there are a number of advisory teams working with the Ministry of Defense (MoD) and Ministry of Interior (MoI) as well as at the institutional level to improve the ability of the ministries and schoolhouses to support and sustain the Afghan SOF units of the army and police.


As always, artworks featuring the insignia are available via my “Military Insignia” galleries from FineArt America and RedBubble

To active duty or reserve military personnel, veterans and their family members: I grant an explicit permission to download the above images to be used for non-profit/non-commercial and charitable causes, benefiting troops and their families, as well as for non-commercial internal duty-specific purposes, such as unit website design, training materials and presentations.

The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, The Institute of Heraldry, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.

Friday, September 21, 2018

75th Ranger Regiment


The 75th Ranger Regiment, also known as Army Rangers, is a light infantry airborne special operations force that is part of the United States Army Special Operations Command. The Regiment is headquartered at Fort Benning, Georgia and is composed of one special troops battalion and three Ranger battalions. The primary mission of the Regiment is to conduct direct action raids in hostile or sensitive environments worldwide, often killing or capturing high value targets.
The 75th Ranger Regiment is the U.S. Army's premier light infantry unit, with specialized skills that enable the Regiment to perform a variety of missions. Besides direct action raids, these include: Airfield seizure, special reconnaissance, personnel recovery, clandestine insertion, and site exploitation. The Regiment can deploy one Ranger battalion within 18 hours of alert notification.

The 1st Ranger Battalion, currently based at Hunter Army Airfield in Savannah, Georgia, United States, is the first of three ranger battalions belonging to the United States Army's 75th Ranger Regiment.
It was originally formed shortly after the United States' entry into World War II and was modeled after the British Commandos during the war. Members from the unit were the first American soldiers to see combat in the European theater when they participated in the failed raid on Dieppe in France in 1942, during which three Rangers were killed and several more were captured. Later, the 1st Ranger Battalion was sent to North Africa where they participated in the landings in Algeria and the fighting in Tunisia in 1943. Also in 1943 the unit provided cadre for two more Ranger battalions created between the campaigns in Sicily and Italy. After World War II, the 1st Ranger Battalion has gone through a number of changes of name and composition as it has been activated, deactivated and reorganized on a number of occasions. However, the unit has lived on in one form or another since then, serving in the Korean and Vietnam Wars before being consolidated into the 75th Ranger Regiment of which it is a part today. Recent deployments have included operations in both Iraq and Afghanistan as part of the wider global war on terrorism.

The 2nd Ranger Battalion, currently based at Joint Base Lewis-McChord south of Seattle, Washington, United States, is the second of three ranger battalions belonging to the United States Army's 75th Ranger Regiment. Primary tasks include: direct action, national and international emergency crisis response, airborne & air assault operations, special reconnaissance, intelligence & counter intelligence, combat search and rescue, personnel recovery & hostage rescue, joint special operations, and counter terrorism.

The 3rd Ranger Battalion, currently based at Fort Benning, Georgia, is the third of three ranger battalions belonging to the United States Army's 75th Ranger Regiment. Recent deployments have included Somalia as part of Task Force Ranger, as well as operations in both Iraq and Afghanistan.

To active duty or reserve military personnel, veterans and their family members: I grant an explicit permission to download the above images to be used for non-profit/non-commercial and charitable causes, benefiting troops and their families, as well as for non-commercial internal duty-specific purposes, such as unit website design, training materials and presentations. Please, contact me for any other intended use.


As always, my artwork featuring the insignia can be found in my “Military Insignia” galleries at FineArt America and RedBubble


The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, The Institute of Heraldry, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry - PPCLI Cap Badge


Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI, generally referred to as the Patricia's) is one of the three Regular Force infantry regiments of the Canadian Army of the Canadian Armed Forces. It is named for Princess Patricia of Connaught, then daughter of the Governor General of Canada. The regiment is composed of four battalions including a Primary Reserve battalion, for a total of 2,000 soldiers. The PPCLI is the main lodger unit of Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Edmonton in Alberta and CFB Shilo in Manitoba, and attached to 3rd Canadian Division; as such it serves as the "local" regular infantry regiment for much of Western Canada. The Loyal Edmonton Regiment (LER), a Reserve Force battalion, is affiliated with the PPCLI but is not formally part of it. As part of this affiliation, the LER carries the designation '4th Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry'.
The regiment is a ceremonial structure, and the three battalions are independent operational entities, under the 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1 CMBG). Although the regiment carries the designation of 'light infantry', two of its battalions are mechanized infantry, and the unit has never been organized as a traditional light infantry regiment.
The PPCLI was raised on the initiative of Captain Andrew Hamilton Gault in 1914, to participate in the Canadian war effort for the First World War. It was the first Canadian infantry unit to enter the theatre of operations, arriving in France on December 21, 1914. The regiment has also participated in the Second World War, the Korean War and the War in Afghanistan, as well as in numerous NATO operations and United Nations peacekeeping missions. The regiment has received 39 battle honours, three Commander-in-Chief Unit Commendations and the United States Presidential Unit Citation..


As always, the above artworks are available  via my “Military Insignia” galleries from FineArt America and RedBubble

To active duty or reserve military personnel, veterans and their family members: I grant an explicit permission to download the above images to be used for non-profit/non-commercial and charitable causes, benefiting troops and their families, as well as for non-commercial internal duty-specific purposes, such as unit website design, training materials and presentations.


The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, The Institute of Heraldry, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

The Toronto Scottish Regiment - Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother's Own Cap Badge


The Toronto Scottish Regiment (Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother's Own) is a Primary Reserve infantry regiment of the Canadian Army. It is part of 4th Canadian Division's 32 Canadian Brigade Group.
The 75th (Mississauga) Battalion, the predecessor to The Toronto Scottish Regiment was raised on July 1, 1915 by Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Beckett. Within three weeks more than 1,500 personnel had been recruited. By March 1916 the battalion was fully trained and sailed for Liverpool. Over 5,500 soldiers served in the battalion during the First World War, of whom 1,049 were killed, including Lieutenant-Colonel Beckett. The 75th Battalion CEF was awarded 16 battle honours, and Captain Bellenden Hutcheson, the medical officer, was awarded the Victoria Cross. In 1921 the regiment was renamed The Toronto Scottish Regiment by the commanding officer of the day, Lieutenant-Colonel Colin Harbottle, CMG, DSO, VD.
During the Second World War, the regiment mobilized a machine gun battalion for the 1st Canadian Division. Following a reorganization early in 1940, the battalion was reassigned to the 2nd Canadian Division, where it operated as a Support Battalion, providing machine-gun detachments for the Operation Jubilee force at Dieppe in 1942, and then with an additional company of mortars, it operated in support of the rifle battalions of the 2nd Division in northwest Europe from July 1944 to VE Day. In April 1940, the 1st Battalion also mounted the King's Guard at Buckingham Palace. A 2nd Battalion served in the reserve army in Canada.
In 2000, the regiment added a secondary title in recognition of Her Majesty The Queen Mother's long association as Colonel-in-Chief. Her Majesty had held the position since 1938. The regiment was now referred to as "The Toronto Scottish Regiment (Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother's Own)." The regiment was part of the escort at the funeral of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother in April 2002. The regimental tartan is Hodden Grey.
On September 12, 2009, the regiment headquarters, A Company and Administration Company moved to the Captain Bellenden Seymour Hutcheson VC Armoury, which is shared with the Toronto Police Service. On May 8, 2012, 75th Company moved from its previous location in Mississauga to a new shared government facility "The Garry W. Morden Centre" with the City of Mississauga Emergency Training Services.


As always, the related artworks are available  via my “Military Insignia” galleries from FineArt America and RedBubble

To active duty or reserve military personnel, veterans and their family members: I grant an explicit permission to download the above images to be used for non-profit/non-commercial and charitable causes, benefiting troops and their families, as well as for non-commercial internal duty-specific purposes, such as unit website design, training materials and presentations.


The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, The Institute of Heraldry, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.

Monday, July 30, 2018

The Royal Canadian Regiment - The RCR Cap Badge


The Royal Canadian Regiment (The RCR) is an infantry regiment of the Canadian Army. The regiment consists of four battalions, three in the Regular Force and one in the primary reserve. The RCR is ranked 9th in the order of precedence amongst Canadian Army regiments, but is the most senior infantry regiment that has regular force battalions.
The RCR was originally authorized as the Infantry School Corps on 21 December 1883, and established its first three company stations at Fredericton, New Brunswick; St Jean, Quebec; and Toronto, Ontario. In 1887 a fourth company was authorized and the next year was established at London, Ontario. Now consisting of three Regular Force battalions and one Reserve Force battalion, the regiment's four battalions are now stationed in Ontario and New Brunswick. With many of its soldiers drawn from Ontario and the Atlantic Provinces in recent decades, the regiment maintains a general connection as the "local" infantry regiment for anglophone eastern Canada.
The RCR maintains a Regimental Headquarters (RHQ) in Petawawa, Ontario, which has no operational command role but handles regimental affairs outside the responsibility of the individual battalions. The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum is located within historic Wolseley Hall in London, Ontario. Wolseley Barracks in London has been continuously occupied by some element of the regiment since construction of Wolseley Hall was completed in 1888. At various times Wolseley Barracks has been the home of the Regimental Headquarters, the 1st and 2nd Battalions, and remains the home of the 4th Battalion today.


As always, the above artworks are available  via my “Military Insignia” galleries from FineArt America and RedBubble

To active duty or reserve military personnel, veterans and their family members: I grant an explicit permission to download the above images to be used for non-profit/non-commercial and charitable causes, benefiting troops and their families, as well as for non-commercial internal duty-specific purposes, such as unit website design, training materials and presentations.


The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, The Institute of Heraldry, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

MACV-SOG: Forward Operating Base Four (FOB 4)


Military Assistance Command, Vietnam – Studies and Observations Group (aka SOG, MACSOG, and MACV-SOG) was a highly classified, multi-service United States special operations unit which conducted covert unconventional warfare operations prior to and during the Vietnam War.
Established on 24 January 1964, the unit conducted strategic reconnaissance missions in the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam), the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam), Laos, and Cambodia; carried out the capture of enemy prisoners, rescued downed pilots, and conducted rescue operations to retrieve prisoners of war throughout Southeast Asia; and conducted clandestine agent team activities and psychological operations.
The unit participated in most of the significant campaigns of the Vietnam War, including the Gulf of Tonkin incident which precipitated increased American involvement, Operation Steel Tiger, Operation Tiger Hound, the Tet Offensive, Operation Commando Hunt, the Cambodian Campaign, Operation Lam Son 719, and the Easter Offensive. The unit was formally disbanded and replaced by the Strategic Technical Directorate Assistance Team 158 on 1 May 1972.

A Forward Operating Base (FOB) is any secured forward military position, commonly a military base, that is used to support tactical operations. They may or may not contain an airfield, hospital, or other facilities, and are generally separate from a main operating base by being temporary stations rather than permanent.

On August 23, 1968, an NVA/VC sapper attack was launched on a SOG compound in Da Nang, FOB (forward operating base) 4. Seventeen Green Berets were killed during that attack—the single largest toll of Green Berets killed in Special Forces history.


The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, The Institute of Heraldry, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Invitation Templates by 3D Insignia & Heraldry on Etsy


A word of warning - this article is pure and shameless self-promotion. The back-story is this… For quite some time I’ve been contemplating an idea of offering my military insignia graphics downloadable and printable in some useful form. Now this idea has finally crystallized. 

Etsy. Downloadable printable invitation templates. We all need them at some point. Promotion. Send-off. Retirement. List goes on. But a good-looking and unique invitation is not easy to come by. This is where my new Etsy shop comes in. You will discover some exclusive designs, not found anywhere else. I started with a few product lines featuring branches of service and one product line (for now) showcasing rank insignia templates for each branch of service. All - instant downloads, and all can be printed on your home printer or at a local print shop. More is coming soon, including law enforcement invites. 

So, whenever you find yourself in need for a great-looking military or law enforcement (coming soon) invite for any occasion - make sure to check my Etsy shop. Custom orders are welcome.

Thursday, March 29, 2018

3rd Battalion 133rd Field Artillery Regiment Commander Coin

The 133rd Field Artillery Regiment is a field artillery regiment of the Army National Guard, first constituted in 1899. The 133rd Field Artillery Regiment's lineage is carried by 1st Battalion, 133rd Field Artillery, a unit of the 72nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, and 3rd Battalion, 133rd Field Artillery, a unit of the 56th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, both brigades of the 36th Infantry Division.

From August 2008 to August 2009 Charlie Battery deployed as a filler unit to 3rd BN 133rd Filed Artillery (56th IBCT) in support of Iraqi Freedom. C Battery was based out of COB Adder, Tallil, Iraq carrying out the mission of Convoy Security. During the deployment, C Battery conducted over 120 Convoy Security Missions. 1 Member of the battery was awarded the Purple Heart for wounds sustained. C Battery redeployed in August 2009 and was returned to its organic Battalion. In 2011 Charlie Battery was inactivated, while 4th 133rd was reorganized into a HIMARS Battalion.

In October 2009, Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, Alpha Battery, and Bravo Battery from 1st Battalion, 133d Field Artillery were mobilized for service in Operation Iraqi Freedom as part of the 72nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team. After completing training at Camp McGregor, NM as detainee guard force units, HHB and A Battery were deployed to Camp Cropper, Iraq, with B Battery being sent to Camp Taji, Iraq. The brigade completed operations in Iraq in July and August 2010 and redeployed to the United States, with A Battery being the last unit in the brigade to return home.Echo Battery 1/133 FA 49th AD served in Iraq March 2004 until March 2005. Attached to the 2ID and 36ID. 1st and 3rd counter motor radar units were assigned to FOB Marez, Mozul, Iraq. Other radar units were stationed in different areas of Iraq.


The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, The Institute of Heraldry, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

United States Cyber Command - CYBERCOM


United States Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM) is a Subordinate Unified Combatant Command of U.S. Strategic Command. The Command unifies the direction of cyberspace operations, strengthens DoD cyberspace capabilities, and integrates and bolsters DoD's cyber expertise.
USCYBERCOM was created in 2009 at the National Security Agency (NSA) headquarters in Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. It uses NSA networks and has been headed by the Director of the National Security Agency since its inception. While originally created with a defensive mission in mind, it has increasingly been viewed as an offensive force. On 18 August 2017, it was announced that USCYBERCOM is to be elevated to the status of a full and independent Unified Combatant Command.
According to the US Department of Defense (DoD), USCYBERCOM "plans, coordinates, integrates, synchronizes and conducts activities to: direct the operations and defense of specified Department of Defense information networks and; prepare to, and when directed, conduct full spectrum military cyberspace operations in order to enable actions in all domains, ensure US/Allied freedom of action in cyberspace and deny the same to our adversaries."
The text "9ec4c12949a4f31474f299058ce2b22a", located in the command's emblem, is the MD5 hash of their mission statement.
The command is charged with pulling together existing cyberspace resources, creating synergies and synchronizing war-fighting effects to defend the information security environment. USCYBERCOM is tasked with centralizing command of cyberspace operations, strengthening DoD cyberspace capabilities, and integrating and bolstering DoD's cyber expertise.


As always, artworks featuring the insignia are available via my “Military Insignia” galleries from FineArt America and RedBubble

To active duty or reserve military personnel, veterans and their family members: I grant an explicit permission to download the above images to be used for non-profit/non-commercial and charitable causes, benefiting troops and their families, as well as for non-commercial internal duty-specific purposes, such as unit website design, training materials and presentations.

The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, The Institute of Heraldry, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Canada Border Services Agency - CBSA

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) (French: Agence des services frontaliers du Canada—ASFC) is a federal agency that is responsible for border enforcement, immigration enforcement and customs services.
The Agency was created on December 12, 2003 by an order-in-council amalgamating Canada Customs (from the now-defunct Canada Customs and Revenue Agency) with border and enforcement personnel from the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). The Agency's creation was formalized by the Canada Border Services Agency Act, which received Royal Assent on November 3, 2005.
Since the September 11 attacks against the United States, Canada's border operations have placed an enhanced emphasis on national security and public safety. The Canada–United States Smart Border Declaration, created by John Manley and Tom Ridge, then first U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security of the Department of Homeland Security, has provided objectives for co-operation between Canadian and American border operations.
The CBSA oversees approximately 1,200 service locations across Canada, and 39 in other countries. It employs over 12,000 public servants, and offers around-the-clock service at 119 land border crossings and thirteen international airports.
The Agency oversees operations at three major sea ports and three mail centres, and operates detention facilities known as immigration holding centres in Laval, Toronto, and Vancouver.
The CBSA operates an Inland Enforcement branch, which tracks down and removes foreign nationals who are in Canada illegally. Inland Enforcement Officers are "plain-clothes" units, and are armed with the same sidearm pistol (PX4D Storm chambered in 9×19mm Parabellum) as port of entry Border Services Officers.


As always, the above artworks are available via my “Military Insignia” galleries from FineArt America and RedBubble

To active duty or reserve military personnel, veterans and their family members: I grant an explicit permission to download the above images to be used for non-profit/non-commercial and charitable causes, benefiting troops and their families, as well as for non-commercial internal duty-specific purposes, such as unit website design, training materials and presentations.


The above information provided in part by Wikipedia, Canadian Heraldic Authority, Global Security, and the official websites of the corresponding units and formations.
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